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The EC technique involves high-frequency sampling (e.g. 10 or 20 Hz) of wind speed and scalar atmospheric concentration data, and yields vertical turbulent fluxes. EC fluxes are computed within a finite averaging time (normally 30 mins)  from the covariance estimates between instantaneous deviations in vertical wind speed and gas concentration (e.g. CO2) from their respective mean values, multiplied by the mean air density (see Aubinet et al., 2012)[2].

Despite the simplicity of this idea, a number of practical difficulties arise in transforming high-frequency data into reliable half-hourly flux measurements. To cope with these issues, here we used the tools implemented by the EddyPro® Fortran code (LI-COR Biosciences, 2017, Fratini and Mauder, 2014)[3] an open source software application available for free download at https://www.licor.com/env/products/eddy_covariance/eddypro.html. The choice of EddyPro® software is motivated by i) the availability of different methods for data quality control and processing (e.g. coordinate rotation, time series detrending,  time lag determination,  spectral corrections, flux random uncertainty quantification, etc.), ii) the availability of the source code and iii) the fact that the software is based on a community developed set of tools.

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Reference

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[1]Sabbatini S. et al (2018). Eddy covariance raw data processing for CO2 and energy fluxes calculation at ICOS ecosystem stations, International Agrophysics.

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